How to up your finance

unduhan-30With continued, significant volatility in the U.S. and global financial markets, driven primarily by a post-Brexit fallout, lower oil prices, and an economically weaker China, investors looking for a “safe harbor” are turning to real estate, either through direct investing or via real estate investment trusts (REITs).

Why real estate?

In a word, it’s all about performance. Consider these figures:

  • According to a 2014 report from CEM Benchmarking, equity real estate investments outperformed all other alternative investments in a recent 14-year period, with 11.3% annualized returns.
  • Another recent study from Real Capital Analytics, shows that foreign investors plowed $87 billion into the U.S. commercial real estate market in 2015. That’s up from $5 billion in 2009. (According to Real Capital, office towers, warehouses, apartment buildings, shopping malls and hotels were the main targets acquired by overseas investors in search of higher yields.)
  • A report from REIT.com spells it all out for investors looking for opportunity in the global real estate markets for the rest or 2016. “Post-Brexit, U.K. and other European returns look ugly while U.S. listed equity REITs come out looking great,” REIT.com states. S. equity REITs have gained 6.8%, since late June, while investors in listed U.S. real estate “now have 5.5% more wealth than they did when the Brexit vote happened just 22 days ago-and 27% more than their counterparts in the U.K.,” REIT.com reports.

While Brexit has driven those safe harbor investors into the commercial U.S. real estate market, there’s little doubt that real estate is a reasonable, profitable and diversified play for any investment portfolio. That will be the case well after the Brexit-vote fallout subsides, and investor attention turns to other volatile global bourses.

So why commercial real estate and the U.S. market? Here are five reasons to join the safe harbor crowd:

1. Look to the New York City Market

The New York real estate market has traditionally been a bellwether for the U.S. real estate market, and this year, it’s been a profitable one for investors. In 2015, for example, Manhattan produced $23.5 billion in real estate deals in 2015.

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Economists have long considered the Big Apple to be a “gateway” into the U.S. commercial real estate market, and with the Brexit vote driving more foreign investors into the U.S. market, and with a two-year period before the E.U. and the U.K. can iron out a Brexit exit, expect that rush into New York City, and the U.S. real estate market, to accelerate.

2. Non-Brexit Market Trends Already Favored U.S. Investment

Metaphorically, the Brexit fallout was only the topping for an already robust U.S commercial real estate market. Global real estate investors have historically viewed the U.S. real estate sector as stable and profitable, with an underlying economy that offers relatively low interest rates (a specific attraction now, since the U.K. raised rates last month), low inflation (0.8%-to-1.0% from 2014 through mid-2016), and a rising economy. That viewpoint is only solidified given softer economics, in all of the above categories, in the U.S. and Europe in 2916.

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3. Foreign investors would be here, cash in hand, Brexit or not

According to a recent report from KPMG, 74% of global economists anticipate that foreign investment in the U.S. will rise through the end of 2016. “Strong economic fundamentals, a reliable legal system and other structural advantages in the U.S. have continued to fuel foreign interest in the US real estate market,” notes Greg Williams, KPMG’s national sector leader, building, construction & real estate. “The continued inflow of foreign capital has led to a significant increase in competition for the best investments, leaving many investors with a major challenge in their hunt for yield across a variety of assets and markets.”